Sunday, April 17, 2016

Climbing at Mt. Diablo, California, United States

Drove up north to Mt. Diablo this weekend to do some top-roping. Specifically, Boy Scout Rocks (See: https://www.mountainproject.com/v/mount-diablo-state-park/105733896).

To get to the climb location, from the 680 just north of Danville, take exit 40 for El Cerro Blvd and follow that east for about 1 mile. Continue on Diablo Road. After about 2 miles, turn left at Mount Diablo Scenic Blvd, which becomes South Gate Road. Boy Scout Rocks will be on the right.



Another way to put it; after you enter the south entrance, and after paying the toll to enter (10 dollars), keep driving until you see a parking lot on your left. It should be roughly 10-15 minutes from the toll booth depending on how many cyclist are on the road. Park in any of the lots here and then take the dirt trail across the lot. Travel along the path for another 10-15 minutes and you should see the rock face to your right.



You have three areas to climb: low, mid, and upper tier. We chose to spend the entire day in the lower tier. Some of the climbs we did included 5.7 The Chimney and 5.10a The Amazing Face.

Almost immediately, I rolled my ankle. I got on the rock to see how the beginning holds were, jumped off to begin the climb, and landed on a root under the rope mat. Fortunately, I've rolled my ankle countless times so the pain quickly became an after thought and my ankle regained its mobility. But for a second, I thought my day climbing was over.


I don't know the name of this problem, but it was a neat climb that I couldn't figure out. I wish I was allowed another attempt to figure out the problem, but the rope had to be moved to another location. Most of us warmed up on the crack to the left of the bolted problem.


Here is Elisia preparing to lead the Amazing Face.


Amazing Face



After everyone had their turn on the Face, we moved the rope into the Chimney and finished our day. The Chimney was an alright climb, you had to use your entire body to create enough tension to progress upwards.
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